The wet, wet year continues

For anyone who lives in South Australia, needless to say it has been a wet ol’ winter, gravely needed after some serious bushfires during the long dry summer. High soil moisture levels from high early winter rainfall, combined with frequent low to moderate rain events recently has the whole region of the Clare Valley, and indeed the whole mid north, vibrantly green and lush, as good as I can ever remember it. The dry, dead landscape of Summer is a long lost memory at the moment. These following images portray a landscape seldom seen in South Australia where rivers look like actual rivers, and green can be seen as far as the eye can see.

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This is South Australia right? Lower Skillogallee Creek, south-west of Auburn.

Vibrant greens as the late arvo sun lights up low cloud drifting through in association with a shower.

Vibrant greens as the late arvo sun lights up low cloud drifting through in association with a shower.

Healthy crops and an awesome skyscape, visual bliss on the drive to work.

Healthy crops and an awesome skyscape, visual bliss on the drive to work.

Kangaroos enjoying a very dewy morning.

Kangaroos enjoying a very dewy morning.

The Light River near Kapunda running wide, fast and turbulent.

The Light River near Kapunda running wide, fast and turbulent.

The Light River further upstream, swollen and over its banks in places.

The Light River further upstream, swollen and over its banks in places.

Flooded fields courtesy of the Light River.

Flooded fields courtesy of the Light River.

Even small creeks were making their presence felt.

Even small creeks were making their presence felt.

The Gilbert River at Tarlee, also flowing well.

The Gilbert River at Tarlee, also flowing well.

Wind turbines spin on the Barunga Ranges, through orographic cloud after heavy thunderstorms moved through.

Wind turbines spin on the Barunga Ranges, through orographic cloud after heavy thunderstorms moved through.

The Hutt River, nears its confluence with the Broughton, running high after rainfall in the Clare Valley the nigh before.

The Hutt River, nears its confluence with the Broughton, running high after rainfall in the Clare Valley the night before.

The confluence of the Hutt and the Broughton was an awesome sight.

Here’s hoping it continues.

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3 Responses to The wet, wet year continues

  1. Miles Peachfield says:

    Good historical record and plenty of beauty too 🙂 Glad to see these rivers flooding as they have been doing since they became rivers, and not remain just trickles due to reservoirs and dams and diversions in the upper catchments. The gum trees will love this winter-spring and I imagine there will probably be a large number of redgum seedlings up later this year. Good opportunity for landholders and landcare groups to get a new generation of redgums along the rivers. Also this is a good reminder or learning experience for landholders and councils and other involved parties of where the water reaches and how it behaves and what kinds of damage can happen (and bearing in mind that the behavior of water in floods can be a complex issue and all floods are different). Helps planning for the future. We know that river floods are natural events and if one lives or farms or builds infrastructure on floodplains then what’s on those floodplains will get flooded from time to time.

  2. Peter H says:

    “Here’s hoping it continues.” looks like you got you ‘wish’ Mark – at least by what I can glean here in England (where its still warm and still fairly dry for our Autumn) from reading the BOM and Weatherzone observations of the latest storm.

    I’m looking forward to any updates and pictures you post – providing you have electricity and things are ok!

    • Mark Dawson says:

      Yep, continued is an understatement!! We lost power for two days in my home town, we had a tornado go over our town and really did some major damage, we were lucky at home though, only lost a few branches, some people lost their roofs. I myself saw two tornadoes, and some very nice storms which will be up soon! As for flooding, we had our wettest September on record (records go back to 1862) and we had some pretty significant flooding. Roads are cut left right and centre, things should be back to normal by tomorrow though 🙂 Thanks for your comment.

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